Hawaii, 1989 – Part 1, Maui


This was our first visit to Hawaii. What a paradise! We spent time on both Maui and the Big Island. I’ll start with Maui.

After picking up a rental car at the airport, we drove to our condo in Kaanapali, up the road from Lahaina, where we had arranged to take diving lessons from Lahaina Divers. Over a week’s time, Kathy succeeded at getting her Open Water certification, but I injured my ear early on, and had to quit.

The dive boat

The dive boat

Kathy, clearing. I injured my ear when I did this unsuccessfully

Kathy, clearing. I injured my ear when I did this unsuccessfully

Kathy takes the Giant Stride off the rear of the dive boat

Kathy takes the Giant Stride off the rear of the dive boat

I went fishing on one of the days Kathy was diving. I caught a small member of the tuna family, which Kathy and I later ate as sashimi.

The harbor, at sunrise, with the Big Island to the east

The harbor at Maalaea Bay, at sunrise, with the Big Island to the east

BoatDec311969_1704

The boat

FishingBoat#15'89TD

Trolling jigs and the fighting chair

FishingBoat#37'89TD

Maui astern

Fish on!

Fish on!

SteveFishing#5'89TD

Portrait of the young fisher guy (only 49 yrs old), reeling in fish

The mate filets the fish

The mate filets the fish

Talk about fishing. 620 lb. Blue marlin.

Talking about fish – a 620 lb. Blue marlin.

Bay and reflection

Bay and reflection

Beach and surf

Beach and surf

Our next objective was to hike into the crater of Haleakala. Haleakala is a volcanic mountain that tops out at 10,023′, and has a road to the summit crater rim. The mountain and much surrounding terrain (down to the coast on the east) is a National Park. The Halemau’u Trail starts at one of the switchbacks on the road to the summit, at 7990′. The trail is located at the wet end of the crater rim. Each Hawaiian island is dominated by volcanic mountains, and has a windward and a lee side, with the former, the wet side, and the latter, which is in the rain shadow of the central mountains, the dry side.

The trail into the crater

The trail into the crater

Into the clouds

On the descent. Into the clouds

On the descent. In the clouds

On the descent. In the clouds

On the floor of the crater

On the floor of the crater, heading for the campsite

The campsite is in the wet end

The Holua CG is on the wet side of the crater, at 6940′

Kathy

Kathy

It rained on us a bunch on the first night! The next day, we hiked over to the dry side of the crater.

HoluaCamp-Edit

Looking back at the Holua CG hut (lower left)

Rainbow

Rainbow!

The endemic Silversword enlivens the crater.

The Silversword is a very interesting endemic plant

The Silversword is a very good-looking plant

HaleakalaSilversword#37'89D

Silversword and a view to the far (low) end of the crater

Kathy and Silversword

Kathy and Silversword

The Hawaiian goose, the Nene

The Hawaiian goose, the Nene

On the trail in the crater

On the trail in the crater

Some of the colorful landscape

Some of the colorful landscape, with Silversword

Black sand

Ash?

HaleakalaLandscape#29'89TBz

Looking back to the wet side.

OheloBerriesDec311969_1721

Ohelo berries

Ferns

Ferns

From the rim

From the rim

From the rim

From the rim

Crater view

Crater view, from the rim

Next, we drove the road to Hana, located at the far eastern end of the island. The pavement was, in spots, slick, by virtue of cars squashing the guava fruits that fell onto the road, while the air was permeated with the sweet smell of the squashed fruit. Guava is not native to Hawaii.

Hana Hwy.

Hana Hwy.

No Fat Women Beyond This Point

“No Fat Women Beyond This Point”

Katydid

Katydid

Roadside waterfall

Wailua Falls, close to the road

Passion flower

Passion flower

We stopped at Waianapanapa State Park, where we were lucky to find a cabin for the night. It was a house-keeping cabin, surrounded by lush vegetation, and with a papaya tree right outside. The steep and rocky coast was 50 yds. away. We fished from the rocks with Japanese dried fish and caught a beautiful all-red fish. And we hiked the few miles along the coast from the State Park to the town of Hana.

HutFoliageDec311969_1708

Our cabin, behind the dense foliage

Rocky bay

Indented shoreline

Arch

Arch

Kath, in cave

Kath, in watery cave

Shoreline and foliage

Shoreline and foliage

Arch

Arch

NBay

Cliff-bound bay

NaturalBridge#38'89

Natural bridge

PoolOverhang

Overhang and pool

PoolsDec311969_1723

Window and pool

Passage with pandanus

Passage with pandanus

Indented shoreline and foliage

Indented shoreline and foliage – succulents and pandanus

Ginger flower

Ginger flower, Hana

Garden spider

Garden spider, Hana

HanaParade

Parade in Hana

FishingBoat#28'89TD

Fishing boat, Hana

We drove farther south along the coast from Hana, to the Kipahulu Valley area (in the National Park), the site of the Seven Pools and the hike to Waimoku Falls

WaterfallInDistanceDec311969_1716-Edit

Waterfall, seen along the road to the Kipahulu Valley

SevenPoolsV2#17T

Sprouting coconut, at the Seven Pools

Seven Pools and a highway bridge

Seven Pools and a highway bridge

The hike along the Pipiwai Trail to Waimoku Falls:

Bamboo#29'89T

Bamboo

Tree#25'89T

Banyan tree

Creek

Pipiwai stream

Creek

Pipiwai stream

Kathy, at crek crossing

Kathy, at Pipiwai stream crossing

Waterfall#33'89

Waimoku waterfall

Waterfall

Waimoku waterfall

Our trip to Maui was followed by a visit to the Big Island, which will be seen in the following post:

https://believesteve.org/2016/07/21/hawaii-1989-part-2-big-island/

 

About believesteve

I am a photographer and have published a book of photography and accompanying text on running the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. The first (print) edition is out of print, but a second edition is available as an iBook (eBook) through the iTunes bookstore. All Grand Canyon, river and nature lovers will enjoy my book: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-grand/id672492447?ls=1
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