My Fate, Your Fate

My fate is your fate

We are all fated to see humanity fail

What a weird way to go

holding hands with one another

as we hurtle from the cliff

 

There’s no way to put lipstick on this pig

no way to put a good face on it

no way to whitewash it

we’ve failed

to figure things out

failed to curtail the greed

that is the ruin of the world

 

Greed

but it’s the way of evolution

to be reproductively successful

i.e. more successful than you

to leave more offspring than you

to succeed where you fail

 

What ever happened, then, to mutual aid?

that’s evolution too

that we do well when we work as one

And it’s true,

it worked

worked to get us where we were

at the end of the last ice age

Well … what happened then?

 

Well … we changed our ways

we tried to take control

of the natural world

to enslave food

and it has brought us to this moment

where we now look over the brink

down at the rocks that await us

 

But, but … , you say

is there no turning back?

Is this really it?

Is this truly the end, such a bitter end?

 

Yes, it is the end, and I regret it no less than you

I didn’t plan for it to work out this way

I don’t want it to end this way

It doesn’t accord with my sense of who I am

the master of my fate

nor does it accord with your sense of who you are

the master of your fate

Sorry, very sorry to say, that this end doesn’t accord with our collective sense of who we are

Masters of our fates

Made in the image of God

saved by his Son

A creature like no other

given dominion over the animals

“Wise man” we have named ourselves

so full of pride and conceit

 

There’s that story about the Garden of Eden,

where man and woman were innocent and enjoyed everlasting life

And, though forbidden by God to do so,

Adam and Eve tasted the apple of the tree of knowledge of good and evil

For their disobedience, Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden and lost everlasting life

So, this is the question:

Can the apple represent anything but

man’s attempt to subjugate the natural world?

 

Those writers knew it then

Our species has sinned

Homo sapiens has lost everlasting life

Extinction by our own hand awaits us

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Costa Rica Birding South, Part 4

After two nights at the Las Cruces Field Station we traveled north, first through the town of San Vito and next down the valley of the Rio Coto Brus. That river was met by the Rio General, coming from the north, to create the Rio Terraba (which we had earlier crossed,  near its mouth, as we had driven down the Pacific coast). From the Rio Terraba, we now drove up the valley of the Rio General, passing square miles of Del Monte pineapple fields. We had twice run the Rio General 30 some years prior, with the take-out near El Brujo. After a stop at El Brujo, we continued to San Isidro, and then began the 9000′ climb over the Cerro de la Muerte (Mountain of Death). Erich told us that the route was given this name when it was a hiking trail, rather than a road, due to the fact that there were cases of people who had died from hypothermia after getting caught in bad weather at or near the top of the climb (11,500′). We stopped at Restaurante La Georgina, at 10,000′, to see what hummingbirds were in attendance at their feeders.

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The Rio Terraba, near El Brujo

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We stopped at El Brujo after the river crossing

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Same as above

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The Restaurante La Georgina

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The feeders were hung outside the windows seen here

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Lesser Violetear. Photographing a hummingbird from a few feet away allows for getting a very crisp image.

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Magnificent Hummingbird

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Female Magnificent Hummingbirds

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Volcano Hummingbird (front) and Lesser Violetear

VolcanoHummingbirdDSCN5028

Volcano Hummingbird

We had stopped here 30 years before, on the way to running the Rio General.

1. CerroDeLaMuerteRestaurant-Edit

30 years ago it was the Restaurant Georgina …

2. CerroDeLaMuerteRestaurantGeorgina#2

and had beautiful wooden floors

We crossed over the pass, which allowed us a brief look at the treeless “paramo” – but a lack of pull-outs prevented photographing the area. After a short drive downhill from the pass, we took a left onto the narrow and very windy road that descended the valley of the Rio Savegre, and arrived at the Savegre Hotel.

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We spotted this coatimundi as we neared the hotel

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It was a very nice place!

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Erich brings out the maps to our rooms

We photographed birds on the grounds of the hotel, which provided a fruit feeder, and on walks along the river.

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Our rooms fronted a bird-rich mass of foliage, including gladiolas

GladiolaDSCN5063

Gladiola

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This Slaty Flowerpiercer went quickly from one gladiola blossom to another. Note its beak.

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Same as above

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Here it is at work, piercing a gladiola blossom at its base

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At the base of the stand of gladiolas was this Gray-breasted Wood-Wren. I looked for it after hearing its song, which is described in the guidebook this way: ” Its loud, lengthy, rollicking melody is one of the most commonly heard and attention-grabbing sounds in its habitat.”

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Acorn Woodpecker

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Yellowish Flycatcher, on an early morning walk

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Long-tailed Silky Flycatcher

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Peruvian Trumpet, in front of our room

 

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The Rio Savegre

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Same as above

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Same as above

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Same as above

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Rainbow Trout, Rio Savegre

RioSavegreKATH IMG_1091

Tree roots, along the Rio Savegre, by Kathy Miller. Below: Movie of the Rio Savegre, by Kathy Miller.

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Spot-crowned Woodcreeper

UnfurlingLeafDSCN5200WhiteFlowerDSCN5166WhitishFlowerDSCN5349YellowFlowerDSCN5184

We left at daybreak on our first morning to hunt down the Resplendent Quetzals, and stopped at Don Raul’s establishment.

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Don Raul’s sign

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Don Raul, second from left, and the group. Success! He found the quetzals for us in trees on the steep hillside above and to the left.  Paths led to the best viewing spots.

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First, we saw this female

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Higher on the slope, another female

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Male quetzal

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Same as above, and showing his tail plumes

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Same as above

QuetzalDSCN5099

Same as above

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Same as above

QuetzalDSCN5115

Same as above

QuetzalKATHIMG_1066

Same as above. A digiscope photo with Erich’s scope and Kathy’s iPhone

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As we returned downhill, we noticed this tree being used as an acorn repository by Acorn Woodpeckers

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Greenhouse, photo by Kathy Miller

GreenhouseKATH IMG_1076

Same as above

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Quetzal art work in progress, created from a tire, photo by Kathy Miller

QuetzalTailKATH IMG_1079

A quetzal tail plume is shown us by Don Raul, photo by Kathy Miller

RedFlowerDSCN5125Red&WhiteFlowerDSCN5121

QuetzalFemaleByRiverKATHIMG_1086

Another digiscope photo by Erich and Kathy, of a female quetzal seen along the river. Movie below: Vegetation on a fence post, by Kathy Miller

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Stained glass quetzal at the hotel, photo by Kathy Miller

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A dessert. The food was very good!

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Oak forest, by Kathy Miller

Next door to the hotel was the “Feather Garden”, with many feeders, birds and a viewing area protected from the rain.

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Feathers Garden

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This and two photos below: Baltimore Oriole

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Acorn Woodpecker

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Costa Rica’s National Bird, the Clay-colored Thrush, in the rain

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This and two photos below: Flame-colored Tanager

Flame-coloredTanagerDSCN5232Flame-coloredTanagerDSCN5253

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Violetear Hummingbird

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Same as above

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Violetear at a very clever feeder orifice

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This and two photos below: Violetear Hummingbird

LesserVioletearDSCN5399LesserVioletearHummingbirdDSCN5355

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Mountain Thrush

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This and two photos below: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Rose-breastedGrosbeakDSCN5284Rose-breatedGrosbeakDSCN5277

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Rufous-tailed Hummingbird

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Silver-throated Tanager and baby bird begging

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Silver-throated Tanager

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This and photo below: Tennessee Warbler

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This and photo below: Yellow-thighed Finch

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Group shot, before leaving the Savegre Hotel

Map: CR#3

As we began our return to San Jose, we made a stop at the Paraiso Quetzal Lodge.

ParaisoQueztalLodgeSignDSCN5431

AltitudeSignDSCN5456

MtnViewDSCN5432

Distant mountain

KathyDSCN5455-Edit

Kathy

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Collared Redstart

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Large-footed Finch, with worm. I looked for this bird after hearing scratching in the nearby shrubs

Large-footedFinchDSCN5452

Same as above

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Lesser Violetear Hummingbird

LesserVioletearDSCN5485

Same as above. The bird is sitting on a sign that warns against touching the birds or using flash. 

 

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Magnificent Hummingbird

PeruvianTrumpetDSCN5441

Peruvian Trumpet

PinkFlowersDSCN5440

Foxglove

ScintillantHummingbird(F)DSCN5491

This and below: Scintillant Hummingbird

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This and photo below: White-throated Mountain-gem Hummingbird

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Hummingbirds at feeder

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Female Magnificent Hummingbird

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Tree with bromeliads. This and movie below, by Kathy Miller

Movie below by Erich Guzman.

This was our last birding stop. We then returned to San Jose, and departed for the United States the next morning. See map:

CR#4

Map of the complete trip:

CR#5

As was the case with our prior Road Scholar birding trip to Ecuador, all of our expectations were fulfilled. An element not mentioned above was that we were provided with an informative lecture about the site, at each venue. The most entertaining lecture was provided by Mariano, the owner of the Savegre Hotel. His father and uncle had discovered the valley of the upper Rio Savegre, and had both lived in a cave under a boulder for five years, while they labored to create a farm. Ultimately, the value of the valley for ecotourism was realized, and the subsequent development of the valley for that purpose has, in my opinion, been done responsibly. The valley and region is also known as “Dota” – and Dota is, no doubt, one of the finest destinations in Costa Rica. Despite strains imposed (according to our informants) by the increasing in-migration of citizens of other Central American countries, two of which are higher taxation and a shrinking middle-class, Costa Rica remains a charming and very hospitable country. “Pura vida” is how Ticos (Costa Ricans) refer to their country and sense of themselves and their lives. It was said to us on more than one occasion.

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Costa Rica Birding South, Part 3

Our next destination was the Las Cruces Field Station/Wilson Botanical Garden. What a great place!

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Our room had a bird-watching balcony …

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and was named”Orchidae”, the latin name for orchids. And had an orchid by the door!

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The flowering shrub discussed before was planted along the walkway to the rooms, here attracting a Rufous-tailed Hummingbird

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Kathy, at the Orchid Room

The Botanical Garden was a delight.

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WilsonBotanicKATH IMG_1018 (1)

Erich leads us through the Garden, with spotting scope on shoulder. iPad photo by Kathy Miller

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ShinyLeavesKATHIMG_1039

iPad photo by Kathy Miller

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LeavesOnTreeKATH IMG_0064

iPad photo by Kathy Miller

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My version of the same tree and vine

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HeliconiaDSCN4719

This, and two photos below: Heliconias

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Kathy@MapDSCN4720

Kathy. Seen above and beyond is the deck that held a fruit feeder and otherwise provided  a great vantage point.

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AgoutiDSCN4731

Agouti

BambooDSCN4707

Bamboo

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Bananas

BerriesKATH IMG_1045

Palm fruit. iPad photo by Kathy Miller.

BougainvilleaDSCN4695

Bougainvillea

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FernCoilDSCN4855

Giant fern

FernKATHIMG_0067

Kathy’s iPad version of same

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Forest, seen from the observation tower

ForestKATH IMG_0068

Same as above. iPad photo by Kathy Miller

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In the Garden. iPad photo by Kathy Miller

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Fragrant flower on a tree that leaned up against the dining hall porch

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Steve Miller. iPad photo by Kathy Miller

But what about the birds!?! A fruit feeder on the deck of the dining hall building attracted many birds.

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Bananaquit in bottlebrush tree

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Blue-crowned Motmot

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Blue-crowned Motmot

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Thick-billed Euphonia (front) and Blue-gray Tanager

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Blue-gray Tanager

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Buff-throated Saltator, in the rain

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Female Cherrie’s Tanager (front) and Blue-gray Tanager

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Cherrie’s Tanager

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Erich Guzman, in front of the feeder

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Female Green Honeycreeper

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Same as above

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Male Green Honeycreeper

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Same as above

GreenHoneycreeperDSCN4802

Same as above

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Golden-hooded Tanager

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Same as above

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Roadside Hawk

RoadsideHawkDSCN4834.jpg

Same as above

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Rufous-tailed Hummingbird in bottlebrush tree

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Silver-throated Tanager

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Speckled Tanager

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Streaked Saltator

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Thick-billed Euphonia

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White-crested Coquette Hummingbird (digiscope photo by Kathy Miller and Erich Guzman)

A side trip took a surprising turn. As we drove past a small farm, Erich saw the farmer cutting sugar cane and told Ricardo to pull over. The farmer had a sugar cane press right there, and we were treated to freshly-pressed sugar cane juice!

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The hand-made press

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Farmer and son cut and press cane

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The juice pours out and is filtered

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And we are served. Left to right: Carrie, Bill, Alice, Kathy, Pam, Cecilia and Rhonda. Not shown: Mary, Erich and Ricardo. The juice was delicious.

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Ricardo. The sugar cane is seen behind.

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I noticed the gentleman’s boats and we began to talk about where he went fishing. He then produced this photo of a huge snook, that he caught in the Rio Terraba.

Erich then asked him about getting access to a nearby pond. It turned out that his family owned a lot of property in the vicinity, which included the pond. We drove to their property, and then were led to the pond.

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But we didn’t see many waterbirds there

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Back-lit lizard on the far side of a leaf. Photo idea thanks to Bill.

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Beehive Ginger

More birds:

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Crested Guan

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Same as above

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Palm Tanager

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Collared Trogon

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Golden-olive Woodpecker

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Fiery-billed Aracari

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Same as above

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Crested Caracara, at perhaps a quarter-mile away

Map: CR#2

After two nights at the Las Cruces Field Station, we started our return to the north, and to the highest altitudes found in Costa Rica.

 

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Costa Rica Birding South, Part 2

On the morning of Day #3 we drove south from the Villa Lapas along the central Pacific Coast, heading for our next birding venue – the Esquinas Rainforest Lodge. On the way, we made a birding and lunch stop at the Hacienda Baru National Wildlife Refuge.

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Small creek

Following three photos are of the Blue Dacnis.

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Cherrie'sTanagerBaruDSCN4311

Cherrie’s Tanager

Following two photos are of the Chestnut-sided Warbler

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Gray Hawk

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Rufous-tailed Hummingbird

The town of Dominical was just across the river from the refuge.

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The mouth of the Rio Baru, at Dominical

We were greeted to the Esquinas rainforest by a sighting of a toucan (Black-mandibled toucan).

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Toucan (Black-mandibled toucan)

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We saw many more toucans thereafter

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The lodge was gorgeous!

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View from our room. The Esquinas rainforest altitude is close to sea level.

The next morning we were greeted by the curassows, who own the grounds. The black bird is the male.

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Male and female curassows

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Female curassow

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This blue-flowered shrub is a favorite of hummingbirds, and we saw it at various venues. Charming Hummingbird.

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Butterfly at same shrub

The following four photos are of the Charming Hummingbird.

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There was a caiman in the pond

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Ginger family

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Same as above

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Golden-hooded Tanager eating palm fruits

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The Gray-necked Wood-Rail was seen all over the grounds

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Green Kingfisher at the pond

The following three photos are of heliconias.

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LotusDSCN4511

Lotus, in the pond adjacent to the lodge

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Mealy parrot

OrchidDSCN4428

Common orchid

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Palm fruit

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Yellow-oliveFlycatcherDSCN4457

Yellow-olive Flycatcher

YellowFlowerDSCN4556

Band-tailedBarbthroatDSCN4435

Band-tailed Barbthroat Hummingbird

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Crowned Woodnymph Hummingbird

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Same as above

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A dip in the the pool was very welcome

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Alice

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Basilisk lizard

We also did some side trips, one of which was a blistering death march, to see birds in the nearby pastures. Gotta get those lifers!

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Dickcissel

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The elegant Fork-tailed Flycatcher

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Lineated Woodpecker

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Red-crowned Woodpecker

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Smooth-billed Ani

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Southern Lapwing

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Streak-headed Woodcreeper

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Stripe-throated Hermit Hummingbird

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Pearl Kite

After two nights at this beautiful lodge we left for the higher altitudes, which began with a steep 3000′ climb to the plateau where we would find the Las Cruces Field Station/Wilson Botanical Gardens. See map: CR#2

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Costa Rica Birding South, Part 1

A year ago, Kathy and I took a Road Scholar birding trip to Ecuador. It was fabulous! So, we decided we should do a similar trip this fall, and chose Road Scholar’s Costa Rica South offering. It was subtitled: Motmots to Quetzals, and it lived up to that billing. The itinerary would take us through the southern parts of Costa Rica, which we had seen little of on prior trips there. Those trips took place in the 1980s and 90s, and were centered on rafting. The one birding foray we made at that time was to Monteverde, in an attempt to see the Resplendent Quetzal – Costa Rica’s most famous bird. And though we tramped around for a good while on muddy trails, no go. The one vivid memory of that outing that sticks with us is the earthquake that shook our hotel one evening. When we saw the lamps suspended over the dining table begin to sway, we got right up and went outside.

Back to this trip, which didn’t begin well. Our afternoon flight from Albuquerque to Dallas was delayed, which blew our connection to San Jose, CR. We were re-routed to Los Angeles, and re-ticketed onto a Delta red-eye flight from there to San Jose. Instead of getting there at 9 PM on Nov. 1, we arrived at 7 AM the next morning, and were, thus,  just able to connect with our group prior to the scheduled departure at 9 AM for our first birding venue. That location was the Hotel Villa Lapas, and Carara National Park and the Rio Tarcoles, on the central Pacific coast. The hotel name – “lapas” – means scarlet macaw, and we were assured that we would have plenty of opportunity to see that bird.

Our group of 9 consisted of older people, which included the 88 year-old Alice. Kathy and I were the only non-retired persons represented. Some in the group were ardent birders, while others were fairly new to the game. By virtue of participating in, now, two dedicated birding trips, Kathy and I must be considered “birders”. While that might be so, however, we both do not keep life lists, which disqualifies us as serious birders, whose aim always is to add “lifers” to their life lists. My primary attraction to birding has lately become a quest to photograph birds, more than merely to check new birds off the list. Our guide, Erich Guzman, was, of course, the single most important individual in the mix. As was the case with our guide in Ecuador, Edwin, he was an exceptional individual. And, in a similar fashion to Edwin, Erich had an “eagle eye” – the ability to spot birds in dense foliage that far exceeded the rest of us; carried a Swarovski spotting scope; and had the means to play bird songs to attract them to us. What Erich added was the invitation to use our iPhones in conjunction with his spotting scope to take “digiscope” photos of birds. Such photos are usually of higher resolution than those taken by all but the most expensive DSLR cameras, equipped with long lens. Kathy took such photos on a number of occasions, and they are included in what follows. The camera I used exclusively is the Nikon Coolpix P900, a superzoom that zooms to 83X. The photographs I present here range from very sharp to considerably less so, but all serve the larger purpose of documenting as fully as possible the birds we saw, which totaled 245 species. The first two photos seen below were taken at the Villa San Ignacio, located in the San Jose suburb of Alajuela (the first night’s lodging that Kathy and I missed), and the second two beside a pond that was located along the road that we followed on our departure from Alajuela.

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Clay-colored Thrush, photographed at a feeder at the Villa San Ignacio, Alajuela. The National Bird.

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Hoffman’s Woodpecker, photographed at the same feeder as above

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Northern Jacana

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Orange-chinned Parakeet

The Villa Lapas is set in a lush lowland rainforest, bisected by a clear creek. The grounds and the creek upstream of the hotel abounded in birds.

Fiery-billedAracarisDSCN4182

Fiery-billed Aracaris, eating palm fruits, on the hotel grounds.

Fiery-billedAracarisKATH MG_0937

Same as above, but “digiscoped” by Kathy, using Erich’s spotting scope and her iPhone. As can be seen, this method provides better resolution.

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Fiery-billed Aracaris

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The Great Kiskadee Flycatcher is seen all over in Costa Rica

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Iguana

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Ginger family

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The creek, viewed from the foot bridge that connects the two areas of the hotel

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Summer Tanager

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Agouti

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Chapel, located on the grounds of the hotel

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Palm trunks

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White-whiskered Puffbird (female)

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White-whiskered Puffbird

White-whiskeredPuffbirdKATH IMG_0972

Same as above, digiscoped

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Bare-throated Tiger-Heron, seen along the creek

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The blogger, iPhone photo by Kathy Miller

What else did we see as we walked the path along the creek? The cryptically-colored snake seen below was passed by seven persons, including guide Erich, before it was noticed. Those seven persons walked within 18″ of the snake. It’s the very poisonous Fer de lance.

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Fer de lance

Our next destination was Carara National Park, located close by to the hotel.

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The park receives much visitation

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Trail sign

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Rufous-tailed Jacamar

Below: 3 second digiscoped movie of the same bird.

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Turquoise-browed Motmot

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Same as above, with caterpillar prey

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Turquoise-browed Motmot

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Nesting Scarlet Macaw. Two macaws occupied this and another cavity located just above this one.

ScarletMacawKATHIMG_0946

Same as above, digiscoped

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Gartered Trogon

GarteredTrogonKathIMG_0969 (1)

Same as above, digiscoped

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Fungi. Below: Movie of Leafcutter ants

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Walking stick

Two side-trips provided these owl sightings:

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Spectacled owl

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Old growth, next to plantation of teak trees (right)

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Ferruginous Pygmy Owl

FerruginousPygmyOwlIMG_0953

Same as above, digiscoped

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Ginger family

Our last outing was a boat trip to the estuary and mangrove forest of the the Rio Tarcoles.

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Rio Tarcoles, upstream view

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Black-necked Stilt

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Great Egret

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Boat-billed Heron

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Green Kingfisher on a mangrove root

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Mangrove forest

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Mangrove Swallow

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Osprey on the left, and Wood Stork on the right. Discarded fishing net is seen in the foreground

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Roseate Spoonbill

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Same as above

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Roseate Spoonbills

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Scarlet Macaws

ScarletMacawsDSCN4084

Same as above

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Roosting Great Egrets

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Evening at the Rio Tarcoles estuary

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Looking out of the estuary to the Pacific Ocean at sunset

We departed the Villa Lapas after two nights, for a drive south along the Pacific coastline to the Esquinas Rainforest Lodge, located at Gamba. On the way, we stopped at the Baru Reserve, where we walked some of the trails and had lunch. See map:

CR#1

 

 

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A Special October Evening, 10-24-18

It rained all night, and then all day. As the sun set, the rain began to let up, producing what I call the “yellow light” and a rainbow. What makes the yellow light that one sees only in these conditions? This is how it was once explained to me:  As a rainstorm (in the west) dissipates, it may leave behind a low ceiling of clouds. This ceiling will often be close above the western horizon, and will thus create a narrow gap through which the rays of the sun will pass. That gap acts as a filter to the sun’s rays, and is responsible for the yellow color of the light. The most striking example of such I’ve ever seen was on a stormy evening as I and friends drove west from Salt Lake City, with a low ceiling of clouds over the Great Salt Lake ahead of us. This created a uniform horizontal gap, which acted as the filter. Behind us, to the east, a perfectly horizontal yellow band of filtered sunlight illuminated the base of the Wasatch Mountains.

As to rainbows, the usual case is that rainstorms move to the east over our house. As they dissipate in the evening, the sun to the west creates rainbows in the remainder of the storm to the east (although some of these photos show a rainbow more to the north).

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View to the north, of cottonwood trees and rainbow across the river from our house

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Extreme telephoto of cliff edge on La Mesita mesa in dispersing cloud. view to the southwest

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Apricot tree (below) and pistachio tree, by our house, view to the north

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Add cottonwood tree to the above

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Pistachio tree and rainbow, view to the west

RainbowBZDSCN3936

Cottonwoods and rainbow, across the river from our house, view to the north

p.s. a brief Google search did not turn up confirmation of what I said above about the storm filtering of sunlight. Can anyone offer confirmation or otherwise?

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California Scenes, Fall, 2018, #3

We left the Bay Area by way of Sonora Pass and then turned south on Hwy 395, which follows along the east side of the Sierras. You can’t beat the great mountain scenery that the drive down Hwy 395 brings to the eye.

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View south from the Sonora Pass road to the Emigrant Wilderness

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Leavitt Pk., from the Sonora Pass road, view to the south

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Extreme telephoto of Tower Peak, which sits on the ridge that forms the northern boundary of Yosemite National Park, view to the south

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View west from Bridgeport, of Matterhorn Pk. (left), and the Sawtooth Ridge

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Descending to Mono Lake, view to the south

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At Gull Lake, on the June Lake loop, and the cabin once owned by Kathy’s family

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Gull Lake, view to the north

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Ruddy duck, on Gull Lake

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Convict Lake and Laurel Mountain, view to the west

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Mt. Morrison looms over the south side of Convict Lake, view to the west

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On Laurel Mountain, this mountainside is identified on the topo map as the Sevehah Cliff

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Returning to Hwy 395 from Convict Lake, looking north at Mt. Ritter (center) and Banner Pk (right). The Minarets are seen on the far left.

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Wider angle view than the above, to include, on the left, the Mammoth Mountain Ski Area

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On the descent to Bishop, looking west to the Sierra crest and Pine Creek Canyon

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And looking to the east from the same spot are the White Mountains

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Looking west from Bishop, Mt. Lamarck (left) and a high snowy plateau that I once traversed, on the way to the John Muir Trail

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Looking southwest from Bishop to Mt. Emerson

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Looking west from Big Pine. I believe this is N. Palisade Pk.

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Looking west from Lone Pine to Mt. Whitney

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Mt. Whitney and Keeler Needle (center)

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Seen to the south of Mt. Whitney is Lone Pine Pk.

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Lone Pine Pk.

The Sierras begin to lose altitude as one drives south from Lone Pine, and into the desert. We spent the night in Kingman, AZ, drove through snow in Flagstaff and saw, further east, normally dry washes running bank to bank from sustained heavy rains. We arrived home that evening.

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